Listowel Writers' Week Fringe

Blogging Listowel's Literary Scene
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Going to Listowel tomorrow

May 30, 2012 By: admin Category: 2012, poets

I’m glad to say that I’ll be heading over to Listowel tomorrow for the day. My Creative Writing students at West Clare VTOS enjoyed last year’s visit so much that they insisted in going again this year! Though, it’ll be a new batch this year.

We’ll be catching the Shannon Ferry from Killimer to Tarbert and driving to Listowel.

I’m hoping to catch up with a few familiar faces from previous years such as poets Teri Murray and Pauline Fayne, as well as John McGrath (who was guest poet at the last Clare Three-Legged Stool Poets‘ reading of the season in Glór last month) and Michael Gallagher.

No doubt I will also bump into some unexpected faces! Perhaps yours will be one dear reader!

Fringe Reading: Teri Murray reads from “Where the Dagda Dances”

June 21, 2010 By: Patrick Stack Category: 2010, fringe, poem, poet, poetry, video

[flv:http://www.clarepoets.com/lww/fringe-reading_Teri-Murray.flv 480 360]

Upcoming poems

May 31, 2009 By: Patrick Stack Category: poems, poetry, poets

I have poems by John MacNamee and Teri Murray on my mobile phone which I still have to upload here. Due to technical problems with converting the .amr files (the audio format my mobile phone uses) to .mp3 format, I haven’t done it so far.
If the worst comes to the worst I’ll just play re-record them from the mobile into the mac, though that will mean a reduction in quality. Fingers crossed I can sort it the other way.

Meet the bloggers at Lynch’s Bakery and Cafe

May 30, 2009 By: Patrick Stack Category: events, journalism, participants, poems, poetry, poets

We’re in Lynch’s Bakery and Cafe. Lynn Roberts, winner of this year’s Poetry Collection competition has just come in and sat down at Paul O’Mahony‘s invitation. Jeremy Gould is seated to my left with Phillip Byrne (a concrete poet). The room is reasonably full.
Earlier, Cathy Desmond, a music teacher based in Ennis, wandered in, having just arrived for the weekend. She had a choice of going to see “6 yachts tied up on pier” (her words) in Galway no doubt ogled over by thousands of land-lubbers (my words), the Iniscealtra festival in Mountshannon, Clare, or Writers’ Week. She opted for Writers’ week. She rushes off after a few minutes to catch as much culture as possible in the limited time left.
Mary Lavery Carrig comes in. The funeral of a local Sister passes – she was a great age, Sister Anne was, Mary tells us.
Ronan Tynan has just arrived and sits down. Paul stops recording to give his full attention to the growing assembly of poets – a couple of more and the current stanza of poets will have become a canto of poets.

Kay Donnelly, another writer, arrives – and sits. I met Kay yesterday – she’s based in Waterford.I catch the end of a story Paul is recounting that involves de Valera, poets and Poland. It’s taken from a play he (Paul) is writing in his head.
The discussion swings around to how good the story Gabriel Byrne told at the opening on Wednesday {LINK to POST}. I remark that his piece for Sunday Miscellany (to be broadcast tomorrow morning at 9.10am on RTE Radio 1) was brilliantly written.
The head Librarian from Mayo, whose first name is Austen (or is that Austin?), makes his appearance. I miss the critical bits of the conversation that ensues due to Jeremy and Kay mentioning the 6 degrees of separation theory. Headage payments comes up when Pat McCannon (from Meath) wanders in and gives Paul a copy of a story he wrote for the Special Olympics about his son Niall 12 years ago. Niall played on the basketball team for Ireland at the Special Olympics. The piece was published because of that he tells us. Pat’s grandfather wrote the song “The turf man from Ardee” – Kay knows it.

It’s the 100th anniversary of Brian MacMahon‘s birth, somebody comments and wonders why there isn’t a special event to commemorate it.

One of the multiple interweaving mini-conversations involves spelling. There is too much emphasis on spelling Kay says. Spelling wasn’t standardized until the 1700s (?) I remark.
Mary’s second boy is 13 today – he’s playing football right now.
I learn that Mary Lavery Carrig is a descendent of Sir John Lavery whose painting of Lady Lavery was on one of the old Irish currency notes.
Pauline Frayne and Teri Murray arrive in and sit at the next table.
I spy a gorgeous painting on Jeremy’s laptop and enquire about it. Jeremy tells me he took it at the exhibition in the Lartigue – he bemoans the fact that there was nobody there, as it’s a beautiful space.
Mary reads the first poem from her new collection which she wrote for her son, into Paul’s mobile, for subsequent upload.
Mary tells me that John Sheehan wrote the piece her sons played at the launch of her book yesterday – it’s called “The Marino Waltz” – and was used in the Peat Briquette (of Bord na Mona – not Boomtown Rats – fame) advert on TV.
More than an hour has passed already and it’s time to separate. Teri Murray is kind enough to read one of her poems into my mobile phone for posting on the blog. I’ll be posting it here as soon as I can get an amr to wav or mp3 converter.


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