Listowel Writers' Week Fringe

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Going to Listowel tomorrow

May 30, 2012 By: admin Category: 2012, poets

I’m glad to say that I’ll be heading over to Listowel tomorrow for the day. My Creative Writing students at West Clare VTOS enjoyed last year’s visit so much that they insisted in going again this year! Though, it’ll be a new batch this year.

We’ll be catching the Shannon Ferry from Killimer to Tarbert and driving to Listowel.

I’m hoping to catch up with a few familiar faces from previous years such as poets Teri Murray and Pauline Fayne, as well as John McGrath (who was guest poet at the last Clare Three-Legged Stool Poets‘ reading of the season in Glór last month) and Michael Gallagher.

No doubt I will also bump into some unexpected faces! Perhaps yours will be one dear reader!

John McGrath reads Yeats’ “Lake Isle of Inishfree”

June 05, 2010 By: Patrick Stack Category: 2010, poem, poetry, video

[flv:http://www.clarepoets.com/lww/open-mic_JohnMcGrath_Yeats.flv 320 240]

Book Launch

June 03, 2010 By: Blog Team Category: 2010, poems, poet, poetry, short story

Book Launch

Book Launch

At 12pm in the Plaza Centre, a huge crowd assembled for the launch of Matt Mooney‘s collection of poems “Falling Apples” and Neil Brosnan‘s collection of short stories “Fresh Water“.

Matt read a lengthy selection of poems from his book to the appreciative crowd. Neils book was launched by Billy Keane and selections from the book were read by John McGrath and Marian Finan Hewitt. Rumour has it that most of the huge crowd are now on their way to a ‘secret location’ for a celebratory session of ‘ceol agus craic’.

Pauline Fayne

Book launch at The Seanchai, Saturday 30th

May 30, 2009 By: Patrick Stack Category: events, poetry, poets

I’m sitting next to Thomas P. Gilmartin Snr. from Ohio on the first row of the audience. Mary Lavery Carrig had introduced me to him when I was passing the stone seat opposite the statue of Bryan MacMahon as I came in. She had told him that the poem he was handing out to every and anyone for the past couple of days had been posted on the blog. He was a little startled I think, but pleased.

At the table in front to my right are seated three women which turn out to be Marian Relihan of the Writers’ Week Committee, Joan McBreen who birthed the anthology “The watchful Heart” which is about to be launched and who is the author of the collection of poetry, “Heather Island“, which is about to be launched.
Marian gets up to welcome us.
She introduces Prof. Patricia Coughlan of the School of English, UCD who is launching both books in conjunction with Joan McBreen of Salmon Poetry.
She tells us that the proceeds are going towards Cancer Care West.
“The Watchful Heart” is an anthology of new Irish poets. Reading it prompted her to think of George Herbert, the English Metaphysical poet.
She lauds a previous collection of women writers brought out in 1999 by Joan, and hopes we are all feminists.
This anthology gives “sense of room to … wander with enough from each poet to give you a sense of what they are like” and contains contributions from 10 women and 14 men. The anthology also contains prose pieces from each poet which gives an interesting counterpoint to the poetry. She thinks there is a Dublin bias [in Irish poetry], but that is not evident in this anthology. She talks about the “looser forms” in some of the Irish poems by for example Louis de Paor. Also stuff from performance poets. Leontia Flynn‘s essay about having to write – She gives a special mention to the oral poetry of Kevin Higgins which is “sassy“.
She quotes from a poem by Cherri Smith.
Joan is a poet of place – the place being the West and the North West. Her collection has 3 sections, many of the poems are place poems. “The central long section is personal experiences used as material
She ends by reading one Haiku from the 10 at the centre of the book.

Ivory
A wedding gift
The ivory handled knives
warmed by your fingers.

Joan McBreen reads. She’s been coming to Writers’ Week since 1986 and thanks Proff C. for a wonderful introduction.
She will read a few poems from her own book and then ask 4 contributors to the anthology present in the audience to read.
She reads “Mobretia on the Road to …” – ‘When you left absence and distance became companions” – a poem of loss.
She thanks Writers’ Week for the inclusion of workshops from which all writers can learn.
Loss is the tobacco smoke recalled in the lilac garden where we met”
Winter Light, Lissadell” – “The ghosts of my parents pick flowers at Lissadell
A poem at the grave of Pablo Neruda in Chile – a pilgrimage she and her husband made there.
The last poem in the volume – from her time spent living in Switzerland where the rain was what she missed most about Ireland

Cherri Smith from Co. Derry now living in London reads – she says that “we as poets are especially attuned to the changes the climate“.
About being in Spain, walking inland from the ruined shore, hearing a horrible noise from somewhere – “These Arts” – “some surgery the mountains had a taste for
John McAuliff from Listowel now working at University of Edinburgh. “Return” – about looking for destruction and enjoying it
Who is Anne Kennedy I ask myself?
Eileen Sheehan from Co. Kerry. “Where you are ” which is about displacement.
Paul Perry, originally from Dublin. “Dawn Sun” about visiting his father living in Budapest in the early 90s, with whom he had had a difference of opinion.

The four poets are asked to sit at the top so they can see the faces of those who will be asking the questions. John McGrath asks Joan to tell us about Ann Kennedy. When she died, Ann left a vacuum for a while in Galway cafe society and was terribly missed. John McAuliff adds that she was an American poet published by Salmon – she had a brightness about her as a person and a poet.

Joan is asked about putting the anthology together. She praises the professionalism of all the contributors and the ease with which it all came together thanks to them.
Cherri Smith tells how writing poetry has changed from an emotional response (writing to find out what you feel) to an intellectual response (writing to find out what you think). It’s a very mysterious thing – about transmission, heart and head.
John McAuliff talks of the danger of nostalgia when writing about Irish material while living in England.
Gabriel FitzMaurice mentions the “internal exile” of all poets.
A lady asks why publishers don’t include a CD of the poet reading. Joan McBreen says doing this is a very complicated and expensive exercise given that you need a recording studio and a recording engineer sensitive to the medium and audience of poetry. A man in the audience disagrees, pointing out the ease with which you can record on a laptop and burn to CD. Prof. C adds that lots of poetry clips are available on YouTube.


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