Listowel Writers' Week Fringe

Blogging Listowel's Literary Scene
Subscribe

Archive for the ‘connections’

“A view from Kerry” blog

April 14, 2010 By: Paul O'Mahony Category: 2010, connections

Great to find “A View From Kerry“. There is a lovely provocative piece called “Listowel Writers Wrong” here.

Do you expect the Festival to present itself as if it was professionally run? Or do you find it charming when the spelling is wrong? Does it make a difference that the Festival is organised by volunteers? Or would it be better to expect volunteers to get it right?

You can even follow the publisher on Twitter @kerryview

Michelin Guide on Listowel Writers’ Week

April 14, 2010 By: Paul O'Mahony Category: 2010, connections, events

Michelin Guide says Listowel & North Kerry has a fine literary reputation… (a short piece)

There is a list of 14 places recommended…

Publicity for LWW2010 Competitions

January 27, 2010 By: Paul O'Mahony Category: 2010, competition, connections

Good to see the word getting out on the internet.

Here’s Arts Grant Finder “blog” spreading Listowel’s writing competitions on 26 January.

Seems to be a useful place to look for stories about the arts round the world. I even spotted a feature on El Bulli closing for 2012 & 2013. Perhaps El Bulli will close up and never be again, and I won’t ever get there…

UisceBots – great blog post on Jennifer Farrell

January 21, 2010 By: Paul O'Mahony Category: blogs, connections, historical, memoir, participants, tutors, workshop

Jennifer Farrell, Nuala O’Faolain and Listowel Writers’ Week are featured in this lovely piece of writing of memoir…

UisceBots is from Dublin, a blogger since April 2006. He doesn’t want anyone under 18 reading his stuff.

I admire this piece. Tis good isn’t it?

LWW Takes a Great Leap Forward for 2010

January 20, 2010 By: Paul O'Mahony Category: 2010, blogs, connections, events, historical, organisers, preparations, Reflections, starting up

Today Listowel Writers’ Week joined the new world. The Festival published its revamped website, which looks great.

But it had a good website last year.

The great leap forward is the simultaneous launch of its Facebook page and Twitter identity. This change is significant. It’s just in time for the 40th anniversary of LWW Literary Festival. I’ve immediately sent a request to be admitted as a Facebook Friend.

In my opinion, it would have been better if the Festival set up its Facebook presence differently – made it possible to become a “Facebook Fan” of Writers’ Week. But the big step it to get out where the public is.

The Festival is in Listowel for a few days every year, but there is a whole world of people who can’t make it to Listowel. There are so many who would be interested to know what’s going on. This Facebook presence give everyone a chance of linking up with the spirit of Listowel Writers’ Week. John B Keane and Bryan McMahon would have approved. They always wanted the Festival to break the boundaries of the parochial.

The Twitter move is dramatic.
Once you go on Twitter, you have to engage. People follow you, and you can’t afford to ignore them – it damages your reputation if you offer nothing to your followers. You have to tweet. People can see how serious you are about sharing, linking, engaging… Twitter is a medium which exposes a lot of your soul.
As soon as I got alerted to @writersweek on Twitter, I followed. I urge you all to do the same. Nothing will do more to raise the profile of LWW, all round the world, than a really good presence on Twitter.

It’s still not clear to me what this blog’s plan for LWW2010 is to be.
We are completely independent of the Festival Committee. We love the Festival. We’d love the Committee to love us, but we have no right to expect it. During 2009 Festival, the organising committee were civil to us. But if they liked anything we did, they didn’t let us know.

I have huge emotional attachment to Listowel Writers’ Week Festival.
It would be wonderful to continue to blog it again. I am completely convinced that all Festivals that are any good should be blogged. It’s all about making the hard work of organising the Festival visible to the audience of the future. All valuable Festivals deserve to be out there, reaching round the globe.

We’ve heard a lot about the Irish Diaspora, what about the Listowel Writers’ Week Diaspora?

This is surely a day for celebration. May the Fesitival of the Future be a credit to the joyful spirit of its founders…

Book Festivals round World including Listowel

January 06, 2010 By: ana Category: blogs, connections, events

From BiblioBuffet a useful list of book festivals in 2010. Lots in Ireland, including Listowel….

Looks like an interesting blog too

The Joy of Writing on the Kerry50

January 03, 2010 By: Paul O'Mahony Category: blogs, connections, events, historical

A fine piece of writing here from The Joy of Writing blog

Another report here from Global Comment …

Irish Times report on Listowel Assault & Courtroom Drama

December 23, 2009 By: Paul O'Mahony Category: connections, events, historical

Today, Wednesday 23 December, The Irish Times published these two letters…

On Monday 21 December, The Irish Times report

On 19 December, the Irish Examiner reported

Last Saturday, 19 December, The Irish Times published this…

Other newspaper articles here

Cedar Lounge Revolution Blog on Listowel

December 22, 2009 By: ana Category: blogs, connections, historical

The Cedar Lounge Revolution won the best political blog in Irish Blog Awards 2009.

This is an interesting take on Listowel today…

Is there any news about LWW2010?

October 27, 2009 By: Paul O'Mahony Category: blogs, connections, historical, organisers, preparations

Or is it all under wraps… in committee?

Does everyone know that LWW10 will be number 40?

It means that the planners must be wondering how they can mark the occasion fittingly. It’s not as if there hasn’t been enough time to prepare for it.

No one’s approach this blog to see if we’ll be live for the 2010 Festival. That doesn’t surprise me because no one from the committee approached the blog during 2009. No one official contact – imagine.

It was as if we the bloggers were the elephant in the room.

I bet there are loads of ideas out there concerning how the 40th anniversary should be celebrated. The challenge is how to let others contribute their goodwill?

These are the kind of issues that cause the passion of bloggers to be engaged. If LWW doesn’t get it’s act together and engage with bloggers, what will bloggers do?

Answer: they’ll chatter about myopia on Twitter. It’s the world we live in now – so different from the locals who set up Listowel Writers’ Week.


Creative Commons License
This work by various authors is licensed under a Creative Commons License.